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Japanese cotton cheesecake with matcha green tea


A bit of a baking phenomenon and yet another hit from the ever popular arena of Japanese food, is the Japanese cotton cheesecake. AKA jiggly cake. And yes, it reminds us of a certain Pokemon too…

What is Japanese cheesecake?

Japanese cotton cheesecake is perhaps better known as Jiggly cake. If you have ever seen those YouTube videos of Japanese bakeries, then you will know why. If you haven’t, then we recommend a look as it is a phenomenon best described in motion.

This half sponge/half cheesecake hybrid is made with a mixture of egg yolks, butter, and cream cheese, folded through whipped egg whites and stabilised with cornstarch. At first glance the texture is more superlight sponge than cheesecake, but the eating proves otherwise with the sour flavour notes and oddly creamy texture.

Interestingly, it would seem that the term Jiggly cake describes two kinds of Japanese cakes. The first (and incidentally the star of THOSE videos) is actually a sponge cake known as castella. Said to have been taken to Japan by the Portuguese in the 16th century, castella is a speciality of Nagasaki that CONTAINS NO CHEESE.

The second, the one that does contain cheese and thereby deserves the title of cheesecake is a more recent invention.

Both versions do however jiggle admirably.

What does Japanese cheesecake taste like?

As much about texture as taste, Japanese souffle cheesecake melts in your mouth and is as light as a cloud. Somewhere between spongecake and souffle, it isn’t overly sweet or cloying but you do a get a pleasing lactic tang from the cream cheese.

Is Japanese cheesecake gluten-free?

You could experiment with just using cornflour to make your cheesecake gluten-free, but most recipes also incorporate a little wheat flour to help stabilise the mix.

How to make a Japanese cheesecake

The process is not difficult yet it should not be rushed. It is after all Japanese and relies on focus, precision and due care. It is a little fiddly but the actual bake is quite forgiving so it is difficult to overcook. Do not be disheartened if it shrinks a bit on cooling, especially the first few times.

Cream cheese and butter need to be at room temperature and spreadably soft so they are easy to blend. Egg whites are easier to whip when at room temperature, but the eggs themselves are easier to separate when cold.

You want a cream cheese that is creamy and soft, yet with a good old-fashioned tang.

Matcha green tea Japanese cheesecake recipe

Matcha green tea is the perfect flavouring for a cake like this, with its subtle herbal tones and slightly sour sweetness. Read about the different grades of matcha green tea.

You will need an 8 inch round cake tin.

225g cream cheese, really soft

60g butter, really soft

6 egg yolks

60g sugar

70g flour

3 tbsp cornstarch

2 tsp matcha powder

60ml milk

1 tsp vanilla

1/4 tsp salt

For the meringue

6 egg whites

1/4 tsp cream of tartar

60g sugar

Icing sugar – for dusting

  1. Preheat the oven to 200C.
  2. Grease and line your cake tin.
  3. In a mixing bowl, beat together the butter and cream cheese until smooth.
  4. Beat in the egg yolks and the sugar.
  5. Beat in the flour, cornstarch, and matcha powder.
  6. Add the salt, milk, and vanilla.
  7. In a separate mixing bowl, whisk the egg whites with the cream of tartar.
  8. Once they are fluffy, gradually whisk in the sugar until the mixture is smooth, glossy and forms soft peaks. This means that when you pull some of the mix up with a spoon it stands and keeps its shape, but the peaks bend softly at the top.
  9. Using a large metal spoon carefully fold the egg whites through the cream cheese mix until fully incorporated.
  10. Pour the batter into your prepared tin.
  11. Place the tin in a baking tray, and fill with cold water to reach a third of the way up the cake tin.
  12. Bake for 15 mins at 200C. Turn the oven down to 140C and bake for a further 30 minutes.
  13. Turn the oven off and leave for a further 30 minutes.
  14. The test for doneness is the same as a sponge cake. It will spring back when you press the top, and a skewer will come out clean. It is quite forgiving so rather over bake than under.
  15. After it has sat in the cooling oven for 30 minutes it will be cool enough to tip out onto your hand and then onto a plate.
  16. Leave to cool completely before dusting with icing sugar and slicing to serve.

Does Japanese cheesecake need to be refrigerated?

Japanese souffle cheesecake can be served whilst still warm from the oven, and will keep for an afternoon out on the kitchen counter at room temperature. After that you will need to keep it in the fridge where it will sit quite happily for up to 5 days. Do keep it covered though so it does not absorb all the flavours of the fridge.

Can you freeze Japanese cotton cheesecake?

You can freeze it too. Either in individual slices or as the whole thing. Wrap in cling film, and then in foil, and freeze for up to 3 months.

 

Don’t forget to stock up on organic matcha tea online and take advantage of our wholesale prices.


This article was reproduced on this site with permission from operafoods.com.au the “Bulk Suppliers of Organic Asian Groceries”.
See original article:- Japanese Cotton Cheesecake with Matcha Green Tea

The post Japanese cotton cheesecake with matcha green tea appeared first on Pep Tea.



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